Texters Beware: The ‘Textalyzer’ may be coming soon to detect texting and driving

Texting while driving remains a commonplace and dangerous practice. The New York Times suggests it is actually getting worse with drivers not only texting, but taking selfies and using other apps and social media sites while on the road. The article estimates road fatalities were up 8% from 2014-2015 due to the increase in distracted driving.

Concern is growing as the problem rises, despite laws in place in most states to ban cell phone use and texting by drivers, and efforts by public service campaigns to increase awareness for this issue. The New York Times article describes lawmakers’ and public health experts’ new plans to conquer this widespread issue. They are getting creative and looking at ways to deter drivers from texting while driving.

One idea that is getting significant attention is a roadside test called the “Textalyzer”, introduced by lobbyists from New York. The New York Times article describes that the Textalyzer, the digital sister of the Breathalyzer, would be used by officers at the scene of a crash to tap into the operating system of the involved drivers’ phones to look at recent activity. The goal would be to determine if the driver had been using their phone to engage in activity against the New York hands-free driving laws, such as text, email, etc. It would determine if the phone was recently in use. If a driver refused to hand over their phone to be analyzed by the Textalyzer, they could face drivers’ license suspension or other penalties.

The article acknowledges that this proposed legislation is controversial, in terms of becoming law, and faces privacy concerns and other potential obstacles. The argument is that the Textalyzer would show whether phones were recently in use without revealing private information, such as the content of text messages, etc. However, many will find this hard to believe and/or still a significant breach of privacy. The future of the Textalyzer remains to be seen, but it is certainly catching people’s attention!

The legislation was proposed by a group of lobbyists known as DORCs, Distracted Operators Risk Casualties with the goals of raising awareness significantly around the dangerousness of distracted driving, actually deterring people from engaging in the practice, and ultimately saving lives. The thought is that if this legislation does pass in New York it could easily spread to other states, similar to the way New York paved the way for hands-free laws in other nationwide.

Please see our recent blog posting about distracted driving:  April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month. Our post highlights Washington State’s existing laws around cell phone use and texting while driving.  Pledge to make a commitment to be part of the effort to end distracted driving, in order to protect the lives of ourselves and the people around us. One text or call could wreck it all!

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

April is recognized by the National Safety Council as Distracted Driving Awareness Month to draw attention to the widespread problem of distracted driving. Distracted driving refers to activity that disrupts a driver’s focus. Cell phone activity distracts a driver’s attention and thus endangers the driver, their passengers, other drivers and passengers on the road, and pedestrian bystanders.

Thousands of people die each year in car accidents involving cell phone use and distracted driving. These accidents often involve cell phone calls without the use of hands-free devices. These accidents also rampantly occur when drivers are using apps, updating social media, texting, or checking email while driving. One text or call could wreck it all!

Distraction.gov, an official US government website for distracted driving, reports 3,179 people were killed in distracted driving crashes in 2014. The NSC reports 660,000 drivers are using cell phones or other electronic devices while driving at any given daylight moment across America.  Clearly this is an incredibly dangerous, deadly epidemic.

Distracted Driving Awareness Month seems like an appropriate time to review how we can make a difference in protecting the lives of ourselves and the people around us, and to refresh ourselves on cell phone laws.

Pledge to make a difference:

Distraction.org asks drivers to make a commitment to be part of the effort to end distracted driving. Drivers are encouraged to pledge to:

  • Protect lives by never texting or talking on the phone while driving.
  • Be a good passenger and speak out if the driver in your car is distracted.
  • Encourage your friends and family to drive phone-free.

Washington State Law:

Washington’s current cell phone laws came into effect in June, 2010. Formerly, drivers could only be ticketed for texting while driving if it was a secondary offense. However, under the new law if police see you holding your phone or texting while driving, they can pull you over and issue a ticket for the offense.

Violations of cell phone and texting laws carry a $124 fine for a first-time offense. This could be significantly more if you are involved with causing a collision.

Cell Phone Law:

  • Washington State’s Cell Phone Law(RCW 46.61.667) states you may not use a wireless communications device or hand-held mobile telephone while driving. Drivers must use hands-free devices.
  • Drivers with Instruction Permits(RCW 46.20.055) or Intermediate Licenses (RCW 46.20.075) cannot use any wireless communication device while driving, even if it is hands-free, unless in an emergency situation.

Texting Law:

  • Washington State’s Text Messaging Law(RCW 46.61.668) prohibits sending, reading, or writing a text message while driving.

Exceptions:

Washington drivers are permitted to use handheld cell phones in the following exceptions only:  (Please note: These exceptions do not apply to drivers with Instruction Permits or Intermediate Licenses)

  • If operating an authorized emergency vehicle or a tow truck responding to a disabled vehicle
  • Using a hands-free device including a speakerphone, blue tooth, or headset
  • Reporting illegal activity or calling for medical or emergency help
  • Using a hearing aid

In emergency situations, drivers are urged to evaluate the urgency of the situation and necessity of cell phone use, and to pull over to a safe place if at all possible.

Fight Your Ticket:

Our traffic attorneys have the experience and expertise to fight all types of traffic violations. Please contact Dellino Law Group for a Free Consultation

Reduce the Stress of Holiday Driving

Our post last month indicated that lower gas prices are leading more and more Americans to choose road travel for their holiday plans. Whether you are out doing last minute Christmas shopping or embarking on a holiday road trip, you need to be prepared. Hazardous road conditions, heavy traffic, and anxious drivers out in droves are inevitable.

It seems a worthy time to remind you of our 10 simple tips for staying safe during holiday driving. Use these tips to maximize the safety of yourself and your passengers, and to decrease the stress of holiday driving.

Dellino Law Group wishes you a Happy Holiday Season and urges you to drive safely.

  • Don’t drink and drive. If there will be drinking at your holiday get-together, choose a designated driver who will remain alcohol free.
  • Make sure the car is ready. Be sure your vehicle is properly maintained, in good shape for travel, and ready for winter driving conditions.
  • Map your route out ahead of time when possible. Have a plan and be aware of projected weather conditions.
  • Buckle up! Ensure you and your passengers are properly restrained in seat belts and car safety seats.
  • Avoid fatigue. Get a good night sleep the night before, take regular breaks, and share the driving if possible. If you are tired, pull off the road to a rest area.
  • Have an emergency plan. Have a cell phone and charger with you so it can be used in case of an emergency. Keep the contact information for emergency roadside assistance handy.
  • Do not text while driving and minimize cell phone use in order to keep your full attention on the road. Utilize a hands-free device if you need to use your cell phone. See our prior blog post for details about cell phone and texting while driving laws in Washington State.
  • Keep a safe following distance, allowing for ample time to react to the traffic around you. If someone is tailgating you, allow them to pass. Don’t try to compete with impatient and aggressive drivers.
  • Watch your speed. Drive to the conditions and don’t drive over the speed limit. Give yourself plenty of time to get to where you are going so you are not in a rush.
  • Remain calm. If you feel stressed or irritable, take some deep breaths and stay calm. Don’t drive with road rage – This compromises the safety of yourself and the people around you.

10 Tips for Safe Driving during Holiday Travel

In increasing numbers, Americans are opting to forgo crowded airports and long lines and travel by car for their Thanksgiving plans. AAA Travel projects that 42 million Americans are expected to take a holiday road trip this Thanksgiving, with gas prices lower than they’ve been since 2008. Driving can be convenient and less costly than air travel, but it can also be quite stressful, with traffic, weather conditions, and fellow holiday drivers to contend with.

Be mindful of your actions and aware of how to maximize the your own safety and that of those around you. Holiday events and celebrations can be invaluable times for family and friends to get together. However, these celebrations can quickly turn into tragedy when people are killed or injured in accidents. Traffic citations, DUI charges, and other driving-related offenses can also put a damper on holiday festivities.

Dellino Law Group wishes you a Happy Thanksgiving and cautions safety on the road. Please see our 10 tips for staying safe during holiday driving:

  • Don’t drink and drive. If there will be drinking at your holiday get-together, choose a designated driver who will remain alcohol free.
  • Make sure the car is ready. Be sure your vehicle is properly maintained, in good shape for travel, and ready for winter driving conditions.
  • Map your route out ahead of time when possible. Have a plan and be aware of projected weather conditions.
  • Buckle up! Ensure you and your passengers are properly restrained in seat belts and car safety seats.
  • Avoid fatigue. Get a good night sleep the night before, take regular breaks, and share the driving if possible. If you are tired, pull off the road to a rest area.
  • Have an emergency plan. Have a cell phone and charger with you so it can be used in case of an emergency. Keep the contact information for emergency roadside assistance handy.
  • Do not text while driving and minimize cell phone use in order to keep your full attention on the road. Utilize a hands-free device if you need to use your cell phone. See our prior blog posts for details about cell phone and texting while driving laws in Washington State.
  • Keep a safe following distance, allowing for ample time to react to the traffic around you. If someone is tailgating you, allow them to pass. Don’t try to compete with impatient and aggressive drivers.
  • Watch your speed. Drive to the conditions and don’t drive over the speed limit. Give yourself plenty of time to get to where you are going so you are not in a rush.
  • Remain calm. If you feel stressed or irritable, take some deep breaths and stay calm. Don’t drive with road rage – This compromises the safety of yourself and the people around you.

The Seahawks celebrate a win and caution traffic safety

It was a sweet victory against the San Francisco 49ers, but the last couple weeks have been rough on the road for the Seattle Seahawks with two separate players making traffic headlines.

Running back Fred Jackson crashed into a street sign, driving too fast near the team facility on Tuesday. There were initial news releases that Jackson was drag racing with teammate Marshawn Lynch, but there was no evidence to support this and Jackson denies these claims. There were reportedly damages to Jackson’s Corvette, but no personal injuries.

According to the Seattle Times, Renton police are finished investigating the accident. Jackson may receive an inattentive driving infraction. These minor infractions come with a fine around $175. City ordinances allow law enforcement officers to stop and ticket drivers who are not paying attention, giving infractions for “inattentive driving” or “inattention”. Because this is a relatively vague and objective infraction and there is no state law defining it, these violations are not part of the driving record.

If Jackson had been guilty of drag racing, his penalties could have been much more severe. Street racing can fall under reckless driving (RCW 46.61.500), which is a gross misdemeanor criminal traffic offense and carries significant penalties. Penalties may include jail time of up to 364 days, a fine of up to $5,000, and mandatory license suspension of at least a month. There may be additional consequences involving loss of employment, impact on immigration status, requirement of ignition interlock, or increased insurance premiums. Please see our recent blog post about the law and penalties involved with reckless driving.

Jackson joins his teammate fullback Derrick Coleman in recent traffic news headlines. Coleman was involved in a two-car accident that left the driver of the other car injured. This accident occurred last week in Bellevue. Coleman was initially arrested on suspicion of vehicular assault and hit-and-run, but he was released the next day. Charges have not yet been filed and investigation is pending. Coleman’s suspension with the Seahawks was lifted, but he did not play in Thursday’s game due to concussion, assumed to be resulting from the accident.

Seahawks coach Pete Carroll reported that Jackson addressed his accident with the team, asking his teammates to drive safely. Carroll stated he was “disappointed” in both Jackson and Coleman’s accidents and he wanted to use the opportunity to remind all of the players to drive cautiously and carefully.

Whether you are a Seattle Seahawk or an Average Joe, it is highly advised that you work with an experienced traffic attorney when facing traffic related charges. A skilled traffic attorney will perform a comprehensive investigation to fully understand the details of your situation and obtain a favorable outcome. Our traffic attorneys at Dellino Law Group have been widely successful in achieving case dismissals when possible and settlement negotiations or reduced charges when appropriate. Contact us today for a Free Consultation, and please………… drive safely.

With traffic patrols in King County on the rise, so is the need for an experienced traffic attorney

Drivers in King County should be aware that increased targeted traffic patrols are coming soon. The Seattle Times reports that Metropolitan King County Council approved funding for increased traffic enforcement last week.

$100K in supplemental funding was approved to go toward King County deputy salaries, geared at emphasizing traffic patrols in certain areas throughout the county. This will allow for an extra 1,100 hours of patrols in specified areas with the goals of targeting speeders, drunk drivers, and keeping school zones safe. The article specifies some of the roads that will see increased patrols.

With the increase in traffic patrols comes an increase in risk of being pulled over, and being pulled over for a traffic violation can be a very stressful and emotional experience.

Please see our tips for what to do if you are being pulled over for a traffic violation in Washington State:

  • Pull over safely: As soon as you see a police car trying to pull you over, put on your turn signal and pull over to the right as safely as possible. Turn off your radio, put your car in park, and try to have your license, registration, and insurance ready before the officer approaches.
  • Make the officer comfortable: Roll down your window. Have your hands where the officer can see them. Don’t rummage through your glove box. If you don’t already have your documents out, wait to get them until you advise the officer of your intentions.
  • Be polite to the officer: Being rude, accusatory, or overly defensive is only going to hinder the situation.
  • Do not incriminate yourself: Don’t admit to anything or answer trick questions like “Do you know why I pulled you over?” What you say can imply guilt and potentially be used against you later in court, but your silence cannot. A reasonable reply to this or a similar question might be, “I’m not sure, officer.”
  • Accept the ticket you receive: Sign the ticket when the officer asks you to. This is not an admission of guilt. It is simply an acknowledgement of receipt of the citation.
  • Drive safely to your destination: Don’t let this ruin your day.  Avoid panic and anger by contacting our experienced traffic attorneys as soon as possible to begin fighting your citation.

Why should I work with a traffic attorney?

There are multiple reasons why working with a traffic attorney is advised more often than not. Please see our prior blog post for additional detail.

  • Traffic tickets are very often quite beatable:  Don’t underestimate your likelihood of winning. With an experienced attorney, your chances of a preferable outcome or a complete dismissal are much greater.
  • There is a lot at stake:   Penalties are significant. In addition to fines, traffic tickets can significantly affect your insurance rates, privilege to drive, and in some cases even your job.
  • License Suspension:  Depending upon the severity of the infraction and past driving history, you may lose your privilege to drive.

Our Traffic Ticket Services:

Our traffic attorneys work aggressively, efficiently, and creatively to defend each unique ticket. Whether it is a speeding ticket, reckless driving, or other moving violation, our experienced traffic attorneys are prepared to fight your case. The first step in beating your traffic ticket is to contact our practice. Contact our knowledgeable traffic attorneys today for a free consultation.

Reckless Driving in Washington State

In Washington State, reckless driving is a gross misdemeanor criminal traffic offense. Reckless driving charges can pose substantial consequences, and it is important to understand the law.

Under Washington State law (RCW 46.61.500):  Any person who drives any vehicle in willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property is guilty of reckless driving.

Street racing, erratic driving, or other behavior that may result in losing full control of the vehicle may result in an arrest with reckless driving charges filed.  Reckless driving is often confused with “negligent driving”, which is a lesser charge with lower penalty limits. The primary distinction of reckless driving is that it involves willful or wanton disregard for the safety of others. Please see our prior blogs posting about negligent driving in the first and second degree in order to full understand the differences.

Violation of Washington State’s reckless driving statute is a gross misdemeanor and carries significant penalties:

  • Jail time of up to 364 days
  • Up to a $5000 fine
  • Mandatory license suspension of no less than 30 days

Depending on the circumstances, additional consequences of a reckless driving conviction may include:

  • Ignition Interlock requirement
  • Increased auto insurance premiums, including SR-22 high risk auto insurance
  • Loss of employment
  • Impact on immigration status

While the penalties for reckless driving are quite significant, this is often a lesser charge negotiated for when the original charge is DUI/DWI. Penalties are not mandatory with reckless driving and are left to the judge’s discretion, and it is generally preferable to a DUI conviction on one’s record.

Legal Representation:

We are dedicated to fighting your unique case. We will perform a comprehensive investigation to fully understand the details of your situation and obtain a favorable outcome. We are widely successful in achieving case dismissals when possible and settlement negotiations or reduced charges when appropriate. The Dellino Law Group traffic attorneys are very experienced and extremely skilled.  Please contact us today for a Free Consultation.

Photo Enforced Traffic Citations: Understand the methods and how to proceed

The West Seattle Herald published an informative article last week, with essential information for all Seattle drivers. The article describes pertinent information about traffic infractions, for which fines have gone up as of July 1, 2015:

Camera tickets are on the rise with more and more cameras being installed around the greater Seattle area. This includes Red Light Traffic Cameras and School Zone Safety Cameras. Fines for camera red light offenses have increased from $124 to $136. Speeding in school zones results in ticket fines of $201. Of note, camera fines are set and don’t account for how far over the speed limit the driver is driving. Sophisticated cameras will catch drivers going even one mile per hour over the speed limit passing a school when yellow lights are flashing. The fine will be the same for the driver going 1 mph over the limit as they are for the driver going 15 mph over the limit.

The article describes how the camera ticketing process works, including the equipment used and the methods utilized to capture corresponding images of the vehicle in violation and the vehicle license plate. The citation is then sent to the registered owner of the vehicle. Washington law prohibits taking images of the faces of drivers or occupants, so photos and videos show the rear of the vehicle only. Pictures and video are available to vehicle owners, police, and court personnel (online).

The registered owner of the vehicle in violation has 18 days from when it is issued to respond to the citation. Options for response including requesting a hearing, signing a declaration that the owner was not driving the vehicle, or paying the fine.

According to the article, city data shows the increase in camera installation correlates with fewer accidents resulting in injury and a decrease in number of school zone camera violations.

Non-camera violations operate differently. Since the citation is written directly to the driver, signing a declaration is not an option. Speed scales exist for non-camera violations, with fines being variable based on how far over the speed limit the driver is going.

If you receive a traffic citation, camera or non-camera, consider contacting our experienced traffic attorneys . Many people quickly choose to pay their tickets without understanding the numerous reasons to fight them.  Some citations will impact your insurance rates while others will not. The best way to know how to proceed is to speak with a knowledgeable traffic attorney. Our traffic infraction defense team can advise you accordingly.  If you choose to fight your ticket, our traffic attorneys have extensive experience and an excellent success rate.  Our goals are to protect your record, your insurance rates, and your privilege to drive. Please contact us today for a Free Consultation.

Don’t panic! What to do when you are pulled over for a traffic citation

The rear-view mirror fills up with red lights… Your heart starts beating fast as you begin to anticipate comes next… DON’T PANIC!  Take a deep breath and use these steps for what to do if you are being pulled over for a traffic violation in Washington State:

  • Pull over safely: As soon as you see a police car trying to pull you over, put on your turn signal and pull over to the right as safely as possible. Turn off your radio, put your car in park, and try to have your license, registration, and insurance ready before the officer approaches.
  • Make the officer comfortable: Roll down your window. Have your hands where the officer can see them. Don’t rummage through your glove box. If you don’t already have your documents out, wait to get them until you advise the officer of your intentions.
  • Be polite to the officer: Being rude, accusatory, or overly defensive is only going to hinder the situation.
  • Do not incriminate yourself: Don’t admit to anything or answer trick questions like “Do you know why I pulled you over?” What you say can imply guilt and potentially be used against you later in court, but your silence cannot. A reasonable reply to this or a similar question might be, “I’m not sure, officer.”
  • Accept the ticket you receive: Sign the ticket when the officer asks you to. This is not an admission of guilt. It is simply an acknowledgement of receipt of the citation.
  • Drive safely to your destination: Don’t let this ruin your day.  Avoid panic and anger by contacting our experienced traffic attorneys as soon as possible to begin fighting your citation.
  • DUI: Please see our recent blog post for additional tips regarding what to do if you are being pulled over under suspicion of DUI in Washington State.

Why should I work with a traffic attorney?

-Traffic tickets are very often quite beatable:  The vast majority of traffic tickets can be dismissed in arguments before the court or in negotiations with prosecutors. If the case cannot be dismissed completely, an experienced traffic attorney can continue to fight and use creative legal approaches to negotiate the ticket to a non-moving violation, which is not reportable to insurance companies or employers.

-There is a lot at stake:  Put your fate in the hands of the experts. Penalties are significant. In addition to fines, traffic tickets can significantly affect your insurance rates, privilege to drive, and in some cases even your job.

  • Fines vary from court to court. There is not a state-wide value set for ticket prices, but they can be quite significant.
  • Insurance companies have access to your record with the Department of Licensing. Even ONE traffic ticket on your driving record can potentially increase insurance premiums for 3 years! Some insurance carriers will even cancel the policy of an insured when more than one traffic ticket is reported.
  • Commercial drivers are required to notify their employers of any traffic violations, putting their job and livelihood at risk.

-License Suspension:  Depending upon the severity of the infraction and past driving history, you may lose your privilege to drive. If you have 6 moving violations within 12 months, your license will be suspended for 60 days. (Department of Licensing).  You may be put on probation (conditional status which may lead to suspension) if you have 4 moving violations in a 12-month period or 5 moving violations in a 24-month period. If you are ticketed for 2 more moving violations during probation, you will face license suspension. There are certain single violations that could lead to suspension or revocation of driver’s license, including reckless driving, hit and run, vehicular assault or vehicular homicide, and more.

Our Traffic Ticket Services:

Our attorneys excel at traffic infraction defense. We work aggressively, efficiently, and creatively to defend each unique ticket. Whether it is a speeding ticket, reckless driving, or other moving violation, our experienced traffic attorneys are prepared to fight your case. Michelle Dellino has trained other traffic attorneys and law students in superior traffic infraction defense and written a manual on defending traffic infractions. She has handled thousands of traffic tickets in Washington over the past four years with a success rate of keeping tickets off her clients’ records of over 98%.

The first step in beating your traffic ticket is to contact our practice. Contact our knowledgeable traffic attorneys today for a free consultation.

Washington State Negligent Driving Charges: Understanding the Law & Consequences

Negligent Driving in the First Degree (Negligent Driving 1 aka “Neg 1”):

In Washington State, Negligent Driving 1 is a criminal traffic offense. This offense is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $1,000.00 fine. “A person is guilty of negligent driving in the first degree if he or she operates a motor vehicle in a manner that is both negligent and endangers or is likely to endanger any person or property, and exhibits the effects of having consumed liquor or marijuana or any drug or exhibits the effects of having inhaled or ingested any chemical, whether or not a legal substance, for its intoxicating or hallucinatory effects” (See RCW 46.61.5249). The term “negligent” means “failure to exercise ordinary care and is the doing of some act that a reasonably careful person would not do under the same or similar circumstances or the failure to do something that a reasonably careful person would do under the same or similar circumstances.” Alcohol or drug use may be determined from a variety of observations including: odor, speech or coordination impairment, behavior, appearance, or paraphernalia in the car. An admission of consumption or usage of alcohol or drugs may also be critical to the case and can even lead to a DUI arrest. Do not make these admissions to law enforcement and help them build a case against you. If you are asked about consumption of alcohol or drugs, politely decline to answer any questions and ask to speak to an attorney before answering any questions.

Both Negligent Driving 1 and DUI are criminal driving offenses that include alcohol or drugs, but there are significant differences. One may be convicted of Negligent Driving having consumed any amount of alcohol or drugs; it is not dependent on quantity or breath or blood test results. In other words, you can be arrested and charged even if you are under the legal limit of consumption for DUI (.08 for those over 21). Also, there is no need to prove a causal connection between the alcohol or drug consumption and the negligent driving. It is not uncommon for one to be charged with Negligent Driving when there is not enough evidence to support a DUI charge. It is also not uncommon for Washington State DUI charges to be reduced to Negligent Driving in the First Degree during the negotiation process of DUI charges.

Though it is a lesser charge than a DUI, Negligent Driving 1 is a serious charge and can result in significant consequences.

Some of the penalties for Negligent Driving in the First Degree may include:

  • Fines up to $1000
  • Jail time up to 90 days
  • Loss of employment
  • Requirement of Alcohol/Drug Treatment
  • Ignition Interlock requirement
  • Probation up to two years

Negligent Driving in the Second Degree (Negligent Driving 2 aka “Neg 2”):

In Washington State, Negligent Driving 2 is a non-criminal traffic infraction (RCW 46.61.525). Under this statute, a person is guilty of Negligent Driving in the Second Degree if, under circumstances not constituting Negligent Driving in the First Degree, he or she drives in a manner that is both negligent and endangers or is likely to endanger any person or property. The term “negligent” refers to failure to exercise ordinary care, as with Negligent Driving 1. As a traffic infraction, Negligent Driving in the Second Degree is subject to a case fine of $250.00 and aggregate total fine of $550.00.

Legal Representation:

Consequences of Negligent Driving 1 are significant and potentially life-changing. An experienced and knowledgeable attorney will conduct a thorough investigation and look at the possibilities of negotiating a dismissal of charges or a reduction to a non-criminal traffic infraction. Negligent Driving 2 infractions are also worth fighting in order to avoid fines and significant increases in insurance premiums. Contact Dellino Law Group today for a Free Consultation and we will fight for the best possible outcome in your case.

 

Contact Dellino Law Group

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